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Staff posted on October 11, 2014 07:50

 


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JOIN US OCTOBER 11 for BBQ and Beverages

A Campaign Fundraiser To Elect Jim Bryan for Congress

From 10 a.m until 2 pm at Turkey Creek Park in Niceville

For More information: Call Darlo at (850) 217-2382

JimBryanforCongress.org

If you cannot attend, please visit his website to donate to the campaign at ActBlue.com"Paid for by the Okaloosa Democratic Executive Committee and Approved by Jim Bryan for Congress"


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Through ALEC, Global Corporations Are Scheming to Rewrite YOUR Rights and Boost THEIR Revenue

Through the corporate-funded American Legislative Exchange Council, global corporations and state politicians vote behind closed doors to try to rewrite state laws that govern your rights. These so-called "model bills" reach into almost every area of American life and often directly benefit huge corporations.
In ALEC's own words, corporations have "a VOICE and a VOTE" on specific changes to the law that are then proposed in your state. DO YOU? Numerous resources to help us expose ALEC are provided below. We have also created links to detailed discussions of key issues, which are available on the left.


This is a partial list of Florida politicians that are known to be involved in, or previously involved in, the American Legislative Exchange Council

Florida Legislators with ALEC Ties

House of Representatives
  • Rep. Larry Ahern (R-51), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Ben Albritton (R-66), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Dennis Baxley (R-Ocala), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting, sponsored 2005 SB 436 "Castle Doctrine Act" based on ALEC model[2]
  • Rep. Michael Bileca (R-117), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Jason Brodeur (R-33), ALEC Tax and Fiscal Policy Task Force member[3], registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Matt Caldwell (R-73), ALEC member who has "attended one conference to date, having paid for the membership and any conference costs with my excess campaign account"[4][1]
  • Rep. Richard Corcoran (R-45), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Steve Crisafulli (R-32), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1] but "not a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council"[5]
  • Rep. Daniel Davis (R-13), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Jose Diaz (R-115), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Chris Dorworth (R-34), dues-paying ALEC member as of 2011[6], registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Clay Ford (R-3)[7][8], ALEC Energy, Environment and Agriculture Task Force[9] member, registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Matt Hudson (R-101), ALEC Health and Human Services Task Force member[10] , registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Clay Ingram (R-2), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[11][1]
  • Rep. Debbie Mayfield (R-80), ALEC member[12]
  • Rep. Bryan Nelson (R-38), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Jeanette Nunez (R-Miami), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[2]
  • Rep. Jimmy T. Patronis, Jr. (R-6), former Florida state chair[13], registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Lake Ray (R-17), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. John Tobia (R-31), attended 2009 ALEC Annual Meeting at a taxpayer cost of $1,150; [15] in August 2011 claimed he has not attended another ALEC meeting and is not a member[16]
  • Rep. Carlos Trujillo (R-116), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]* Rep. Will Weatherford (R-61), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. John Wood (R-41), Florida state chair,[17] ALEC Health and Human Services Task Force member[18] who calls himself "proud to be a member of ALEC and has attended two annual conferences - Atlanta in 2009 and most recently New Orleans in 2011"[19][1]
  • Rep. Dana Young (R-Tampa), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[2]
Senate
Former Representatives
  • Former Rep. Sandra Adams (former R-33), ALEC Public Safety and Elections Task Force[23]
  • Rep. Rachel Burgin (R-56), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Fred Costello (R-26), "could not afford the time out of my business to attend" the 2011 ALEC Annual meeting but looks "forward to attending ALEC in the future"[24]
  • Rep. Brad Drake (R -5)[7]
  • Rep. Rich Glorioso (R-Longwood), attended 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[2]
  • Former Rep. Buddy Johnson, Hillsborough County Supervisor of Elections till 2009. Investigated for misappropriation of funds[25]
  • Rep. Ana Rivas Logan (R-114), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Former Rep. Jerry L. Maygarden (R-2, former House Majority Leader)[21]
  • Rep. Peter Nehr (R-48), registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Scott Plakon (R-37), ALEC International Relations Task Force member[26] , worked with ALEC in 2011 on "a proposed constitutional amendment that prohibits laws that would force people to join health care plans, an attack on federal health care changes"[2]
  • Former Rep. Bill Posey (now Congressman, R-Rockledge), ALEC Alumni in Congress[27] and 1999 recipient of ALEC "Legislator of the Year" Award[28]
  • Rep. Stephen L. Precourt (R-41), ALEC Tax and Fiscal Policy Task Force member[29] , registered to attend 2011 ALEC Annual Meeting[1]
  • Rep. Debby Sanderson (R-31), former member of ALEC Board of Directors and State Chair[21]
  • Former Rep. Michael J. Scionti, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for U.S. Intergovernmental Affairs and Homeland Defense[30]
  • Rep. David Thomas (R-70) [25]
  • Former Rep. Thomas E. Warner [25]
Former Senators

References via Sourcewatch


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Frequently Asked Questions About ALEC

 Moyers and Company

What is ALEC?
The American Legislative Exchange Council is a nearly 40-year-old conservative nonprofit that connects members of the business community with elected state lawmakers. According to its website, ALEC “works to advance the fundamental principles of free-market enterprise, limited government and federalism at the state level.”

Bush administration Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Leavitt addresses members of the American Legislative Exchange Council Thursday, July 29, 2004, in Seattle. Behind Leavitt is a sign for the morning's sponsor, ExxonMobil. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Bush administration Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Leavitt addresses members of the American Legislative Exchange Council in 2004. Behind Leavitt is a sign for the morning's sponsor, ExxonMobil. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Who belongs to ALEC?
ALEC says it has over 2000 dues-paying state legislators among its membership. Representatives of private interests, such as corporations and lobbying organizations, and policy analysts are also ALEC members.

Who funds ALEC?
ALEC’s legislative members pay dues of $100 for two years, but more than 98 percent of ALEC’s funding comes from other sources, such as corporate donations. Corporate members pay dues that range from $7,000 to $25,000, and additional fees to participate on task forces. ALEC’s website says that no single donor provides more than 5 percent of ALEC’s revenues.

President Bush speaks to the American Legislative Exchange Council in Grapevine, Texas, in 2005. The Council presented Bush with the Thomas Jefferson Freedom Award. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)

President Bush speaks to the American Legislative Exchange Council in Grapevine, Texas, in 2005. The Council presented Bush with the Thomas Jefferson Freedom Award. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)

What does ALEC do?
ALEC develops “model legislation” — templates for bills that are introduced in state houses across the country by ALEC members.  These bills are developed by members of ALEC’s eight task forces and deal with policy areas such as civil justice, education and energy, environment and agriculture. A ninth task force, public safety and elections, was responsible for voter ID and “stand your ground” legislation, but disbanded in the wake of Trayvon Martin’s death. Each task force is open to any ALEC member (including corporate lobbyists). ALEC describes its task forces as “public-policy laboratories where legislators develop model policies to use across the country.”

Many recent, controversial laws either have been based on ALEC model bills or have inspired ALEC model bills, including Arizona’s immigration law, Wisconsin’s collective bargaining law, and Pennsylvania’s voter ID law. At least 1,000 bills drawing on ALEC model legislation are introduced each year, about 200 of which become laws.

President George H. W. Bush gestures while addressing the American Legislative Exchange Council in 1992, Washington, D.C. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma)

President George H. W. Bush gestures while addressing the American Legislative Exchange Council in 1992, Washington, D.C. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma)

ALEC also hosts conferences, where members meet to discuss legislation and conservative objectives in government. Speakers at these conferences often include national politicians, corporate lobbyists and conservative political strategists.

What’s the connection between ALEC and the Trayvon Martin shooting?
After Trayvon Martin’s shooter, George Zimmerman, sought protection under Florida’s controversial Stand Your Ground law, it was revealed that the law had formed the basis of a model law that ALEC introduced in other states. As the shooting gained national attention, many corporations, including Coca-Cola, Kraft Foods, McDonald’s, Mars, Proctor & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, dropped out of ALEC.

Are politicians at the federal level involved with ALEC?
ALEC’s political membership is limited to state legislators, but many former state legislators who are now U.S. senators, congressional representatives and state governors are among ALEC’s alumni. U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker are two high-profile examples.

What is ALEC Exposed?
ALEC Exposed is an online wiki run by a watchdog group, the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD), listing individuals tied to ALEC. Much of its information is based on a document dump from a whistleblower who passed information to CMD and the progressive advocacy organization Common Cause. It lists all state level politicians known to be involved in ALEC, federal politicians who are ALEC alumni and politicians who were members of ALEC but have renounced the organization.


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Staff posted on October 8, 2014 17:16

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Disclaimer
Paid for by the Santa Rosa Democratic Executive Committee 5246 Stewart Street Milton Fl. 32570 (850) 623-2345 and not authorized by any federal candidate or candidate's committee.